Workaround: Chrome will not PIN sites to Windows 10 Taskbar

I could rant for a long while about how Microsoft removed the verb “Pin to Taskbar” from the Shell.Application COM object but I won’t. I will simply say that I think they did that to keep OEM’s from putting crap on it when you buy a new PC. However as so often is the case, there was unintended side effects. Reasonable use cases like Chrome being able to PIN websites and Corporate IT being able to PIN corporate applications comes to mind. Lets not talk about how anti-competitive it looks when Internet Explorer (IE) is able to still pin items to the taskbar yet 3rd Party browsers like Chrome are left in the dust.

Ok I said I wouldn’t rant, here is the workaround.

  • Simply do the normal process in Chrome to PIN something to the start menu.
  • Then go here:
    • C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Chrome Apps
      • Note: <username> will be your username you use to logon to Windows. If you dont know it simply go to c:\users and you should be able to figure it out
  • Find the shortcut Chrome created for your website, right click and you will see “PIN to Taskbar”

Also thanks to Reddit for figuring this out:

Chrome "Add To Taskbar" Issue from Windows10

Leave a comment if it helped you!

-Eric

Get a list of all System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM 2012 R2) Users via SQL

Ever need to send a notice to your System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM) users like “Upgrade to UR7 coming” but realized you never took the time to collect all of their names?

Here is some quick SQL that will give you the names of anyone who has actually used the platform:

select
distinct replace(SessionOwner, ‘contoso\’,”) as Username
from [tbl_TR_TaskTrail]
order by 1

As a added bonus if you replace contoso with your domain name it will strip that out making it ready to past into outlook for name resolution.

Enjoy!

-Eric

Search Active Directory for Specific Word or Phrase (string) in a Group

Ever tried to search for a group by name but the part you know is in the middle? Did you think you would be smart and go to the advanced tab then do “blah” contains, hit search and find nothing?

Quickest way to find is actually via PowerShell

Get-ADGroup -Filter {Name -like “*blah*”} | select SAMAccountName

Works great!

Enjoy

-Eric

Offline Downloading of Windows 10 Patchs

Anyone looking at Microsoft KB’s may be surprised to see that there are no direct download links. However you can still download the patches manually by finding and downloding them here:

http://catalog.update.microsoft.com

This can also be used to import patches into WSUS if needed.

Hope it help

-Eric

Fix | Windows 10, “the connection cannot proceed because authentication is not enabled”

Ah security, the balance between not allowing access at all and allowing too much access.

In Windows 10 Microsoft changed RDP’s defaults. They modified the default for “SecurityLayer” from 0 to 2. Even if you go into the user interface and disable: “Allow connections only from computers running Remote Desktop with Network Level Authentication (recommended)” Still doesn’t change that value to a 2.

Simple fix:

  1. Open RegEdit
  2. Navigate to this Key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server\WinStations\RDP-Tcp
  3. Change “SecurityLayer” to a zero
  4. Reboot and done!

Powershell | Using Modify AD Groups with Alternate Credentials

Quick one. Had an issue where I needed to remove a user from a AD group in another domain. To my surprise it was harder then I had thought. At first I settled on using set-QADGroupMember (the Quest Powershell CMDLET) as it takes -connectionusername and -connectionpassword. However it was dog slow. I think that was due to being over a WAN link and it was querying all members (which took about 2-3 mins).

I needed something swifter. I went directly to the .NET controls and reduced the time to about 15 second.

$GroupDN = “LDAP://CN=GroupName,OU=Distribution Lists,DC=domain,DC=local”
$Group = New-Object -TypeName System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry -ArgumentList $GroupDN,”username”,”Password”
#To Add
$Group.Properties[“member”].Add(“DN of the User you wish to add”)
#To Remove
$Group.Properties[“member”].Remove(“DN of the User you wish removed”)
$Group.CommitChanges()
$Group.Close()

Enjoy!

-Eric

Powershell | Get Current User Principle Name (UPN)

Quicky,

I had a need to write a Powershell script that would figure out what the current users UPN (User Principle Name) was. Believe it or not I was dumbfounded there wasn’t a good post on it anywhere.  So here is the code:

 

$strFilter = “(&(objectCategory=User)(SAMAccountName=$Env:USERNAME))”
$objDomain = New-Object System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry
$objSearcher = New-Object System.DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher
$objSearcher.SearchRoot = $objDomain
$objSearcher.PageSize = 1
$objSearcher.Filter = $strFilter
$objSearcher.SearchScope = “Subtree”
$objSearcher.PropertiesToLoad.Add(“userprincipalname”) | Out-Null
$colResults = $objSearcher.FindAll()

$UPN = $colResults[0].Properties.userprincipalname
$UPN

 

Enjoy, if you needed this and found it here please let me a comment, always glad to hear when these things help people out!

Powershell | The Last $Error and Emailing it

OMG some things in Powershell are just too confusing to be useful. What if you need to see the last error message again. What if you want to write it into your script to email you when the error happens?

Well first, its all in $Error

However, $Error is an array.  To access it really requires notation like this:

$Error[0]

The [0] says give me back the last error. Where [1] would say to give me back the second to last error message.

The Problem….

Ok now here is where it gets “funky”. If you just type $Error[0] you get the entire error message like so: (note I am using an error message from some Lync work I have been doing, the names have been changed to protect well me lol)

Set-CsUser : Management object not found for identity “Jerry.Springer@Contoso.com”.
At C:\Scripts\EnableLyncUsers.ps1:138 char:15
+                 Set-CsUser <<<<  -Identity $user.UserPrincipalName -SipAddress $user.UserPrincipalName
    + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [Set-CsUser], ManagementException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : Microsoft.Rtc.Management.AD.ManagementException,Microsoft.Rtc.Management.AD.Cmdlets.S
   etOcsUserCmdlet

BUT…. if you type write-host $Error[0] you get this:

Management object not found for identity “Jerry.Springer@Contoso.com”.

So what gives right??? Why when you use Write-Host OR even better when you try to email $Error[0] do we get the crappy short error message? Well I don’t have the answer BUT I do have a great work around.

The Solution….

[string]$ErrorString = $Error[0].Exception
[string]$ErrorString = $ErrorString + ” `n `n ”
[string]$ErrorString = $ErrorString + $Error[0].InvocationInfo.PositionMessage

(that’s 3 lines BTW)

As far as I can tell the only thing one needs are the short error message and the line, script, and command. To do this use the code above and then simply use Write-Host or email that new $ErrorString variable. If you need other data follow the info below from how I figured this out.

Emailing the Error? Simply use this code (replace stuff inside of < > then remove the < >):

    [string]$ErrorString = $Error[0].Exception
    [string]$ErrorString = $ErrorString + ” `n `n ”
    [string]$ErrorString = $ErrorString + $Error[0].InvocationInfo.PositionMessage

    $SmtpClient = new-object system.net.mail.smtpClient
    $MailMessage = New-Object system.net.mail.mailmessage
    $SmtpClient.Host = “<SMTP IP OR NAME>”
    $mailmessage.from = <from@domain.com>
    $mailmessage.To.add(“email1@domain.com,email2@domain.com”)
    $mailmessage.Subject = “<Subject of Email>”
    $MailMessage.IsBodyHtml = $false
    $mailmessage.Body = $ErrorString
 
    $smtpclient.Send($mailmessage)

How did I figure this out?

First I indexed $Error to get me the first result [0]

Next I used the power of Get-Member

$Error[0] | Get-Member

This dumped out all the properties

TypeName: System.Management.Automation.ErrorRecord

Name                  MemberType     Definition                                                                    
—-                  ———-     ———-                                                                    
Equals                Method         bool Equals(System.Object obj)                                                
GetHashCode           Method         int GetHashCode()                                                             
GetObjectData         Method         System.Void GetObjectData(System.Runtime.Serialization.SerializationInfo inf…
GetType               Method         type GetType()                                                                
ToString              Method         string ToString()                                                             
CategoryInfo          Property       System.Management.Automation.ErrorCategoryInfo CategoryInfo {get;}            
ErrorDetails          Property       System.Management.Automation.ErrorDetails ErrorDetails {get;set;}             
Exception             Property       System.Exception Exception {get;}                                             
FullyQualifiedErrorId Property       System.String FullyQualifiedErrorId {get;}                                    
InvocationInfo        Property       System.Management.Automation.InvocationInfo InvocationInfo {get;}             
PipelineIterationInfo Property       System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection`1[[System.Int32, mscorlib,…
TargetObject          Property       System.Object TargetObject {get;}                                             
PSMessageDetails      ScriptProperty System.Object PSMessageDetails {get=& { Set-StrictMode -Version 1; $this.Exc…

All of the properties normally can be accessed like this:

$Error[0].Exception

But if you try to write-host $Error[0].InvocationInfo you get:

System.Management.Automation.InvocationInfo

Well that’s not very useful… the reason for this is there are deeper items in the $Error[0].InvocationInfo tree. So if we go ahead and whip out get-member again on $Error[0].InvocationInfo lets see what we get:

TypeName: System.Management.Automation.InvocationInfo

Name             MemberType Definition                                                                             
—-             ———- ———-                                                                             
Equals           Method     bool Equals(System.Object obj)                                                         
GetHashCode      Method     int GetHashCode()                                                                      
GetType          Method     type GetType()                                                                         
ToString         Method     string ToString()                                                                      
BoundParameters  Property   System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary`2[[System.String, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Cu…
CommandOrigin    Property   System.Management.Automation.CommandOrigin CommandOrigin {get;}                        
ExpectingInput   Property   System.Boolean ExpectingInput {get;}                                                   
HistoryId        Property   System.Int64 HistoryId {get;}                                                          
InvocationName   Property   System.String InvocationName {get;}                                                    
Line             Property   System.String Line {get;}                                                              
MyCommand        Property   System.Management.Automation.CommandInfo MyCommand {get;}                              
OffsetInLine     Property   System.Int32 OffsetInLine {get;}                                                       
PipelineLength   Property   System.Int32 PipelineLength {get;}                                                     
PipelinePosition Property   System.Int32 PipelinePosition {get;}                                                   
PositionMessage  Property   System.String PositionMessage {get;}                                                   
ScriptLineNumber Property   System.Int32 ScriptLineNumber {get;}                                                   
ScriptName       Property   System.String ScriptName {get;}                                                        
UnboundArguments Property   System.Collections.Generic.List`1[[System.Object, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=…

Ah… there’s more stuff. Lastly I just needed to figure out what items inside of $Error[0].InvocationInfo I needed. Turns out just one thing. So to write-host it all I needed to do is call:

Write-Host $Error[0].InvocationInfo.PositionMessage

Hope that opens your mind to how more complex objects work in Powershell.

Hey!

Did I help? Make Sense? Something Wrong? Put it in the comments. Love to hear when my write-ups help folks out.

Enjoy

-Eric

Office 2013 Installer Failure | “not supported upgrading from a preview version”

Well you are likely here because you are the adventurous type who had Office 2013 Preview installed and then tried to uninstall and install the full release.

Microsoft Office 2013 does not support upgrading from a preview version of Microsoft Office 2013. You must first uninstall these preview versions of Microsoft Office 2013 products and associated technologies:

Microsoft Office 2013 Professional Plus 2013

Some may advise you to go into control panel and remove all Office items from the programs list. However if you are like me then that will not be enough.

If you are still having issues after reviewing the programs list in the control panel then go ahead and delete the following registry key:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Installer\Products0005102110000000100000000F01FEC

If for some reason that isn’t enough, then delete these as well:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Installer\Patches\D5360E4B109548941BFB078A144B11D5
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Installer\Patches\D5360E4B109548941BFB078A144B11D5
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\15.0\

if that still doesn’t do it, then search for the phrase “2013” at the root of the registry and start wacking keys that look office 2013 related. However I am pretty sure that first one will take care of you.

Hey if I helped ya, or you can add something to the conversation then please let me know in the comments belooooooow! I take payment in the form of “thanks” in the comments 😉

Windows 8 System Image Tool, Where did it go?

Quick one….

Here is how you can do a full disk image of a Windows 8 system.

If you are like me and just finished setting up your shinny new Windows 8 system, you installed all of your non-metro apps, you activated all of your professional software and now thought, “damn good time to take a image” then had a hard time figuring out where it went…. you are not alone.

In what looks like a ridiculous and frustrating war between Microsoft and Windows Desktop the backup tool is now called “Windows 7 File Recovery”. They also took out direct links to “create a system image” as well.

Yes you are not losing your mind, its not Windows 7, nor is it only file recovery, it’s the only place to get to total system imaging.

Simply Search Metro for “Windows 7 File Recovery” and click the Settings area on the right and you will find it.

image

image

Once in the “Windows 7 File Recovery Tool” go to the top left “Create a system image”

image